2017 Year in Review / by Jessica Lee

 I spent a month this summer living in Riomaggiore, a small village of 2000 people on the Ligurian coast of Italy.

I spent a month this summer living in Riomaggiore, a small village of 2000 people on the Ligurian coast of Italy.

2017 was a busy year.

I checked a couple of things off my bucket list and lived many vastly different lifestyles during the year – from spending a month living in the Cinque Terre; waking up leisurely to the sound of waves; to spending hours of my life commuting in rush hour traffic in the sprawling Canadian metropolis known as Toronto; something I once thought I would never do.

But what’s fascinating about people in general is our capacity for change, and how each experience in our lives shapes who we become.

I make a year-end review each year, where I recount my biggest mistakes or discoveries aka “learning opportunities”, and figure out how I can live better next year based off of what I learned. What I realize now, after thinking about it for weeks, is that my so-called "biggest mistakes" from this year are actually not so significant in the long run. I missed a couple of flights because of not double-checking details, and had to buy expensive tickets last minute. And made some mistakes with who I thought I could let into my life. But all these mishaps are relatively easy to get over. The most important thing I learned in 2017 is that there are limitations to what one can achieve in a year.

 The top of Erice, Sicily, where I experienced one of the most stunning sunsets in May

The top of Erice, Sicily, where I experienced one of the most stunning sunsets in May

A theme of this year was accepting where my limitations were, in terms of time and resources, as well as my physical and mental capabilities. I was commissioned to do more commercial photography gigs this year than any other year in the past and as a result, I did not have enough time to achieve all I set out to do at the beginning of the year. But I learned to be more forgiving of myself for not crossing everything off the list. That is important too.

January started off haphazardly in Bangkok as I was recovering from an injured knee from my December motorcycle accident in Vietnam. I was in the middle of my South East Asia backpacking trip which I started in October 2016 and was about to go to Laos for the first time. I would like to say I started the year off strong, but the honest truth is I couldn’t walk far from the pain in my leg, and I was drugged up on four different types of antibiotics. I spent the end of 2016 listening to the fireworks from the place I was staying at, then heading to bed almost immediately. Through this experience, I realized how much I valued my independence and health and being able to walk everywhere by myself without assistance. It was humbling to ask for help and to connect with people through their own stories of accidents/adventure. I learned to slow down because I literally couldn't go at my regular speed anymore. For someone who is very driven, sometimes forced relaxation is necessary. 

 Vang Vieng, Laos in January

Vang Vieng, Laos in January

 Dubrovnik, Croatia, in May

Dubrovnik, Croatia, in May

This year, I made a resolution to read 40 books and to visit ten new countries. I failed both, reading only 30 books and visiting only five new countries (Laos, Malta, Croatia, and soon Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico). More and more, as I’m getting older, I’m realizing there are limits to what one person can do in a year, or in a life even. When I was young, I used to have huge ambitions that I have since focused to just one or two big goals. There is just too much to experience in life and to try to do too many things risks not doing each thing fully and in depth. I would rather have a higher quality of experience rather than a quantity. I am grateful I’ve been able to do so many fun and eye-opening things in my twenties so far. 

 The Pacific Northwest, more specifically, Vance Creek Bridge, Washington. My friend Eric took me here and challenged me to walk across. I took one look at the drop below and said "no". 

The Pacific Northwest, more specifically, Vance Creek Bridge, Washington. My friend Eric took me here and challenged me to walk across. I took one look at the drop below and said "no". 

I saw some truly beautiful and stunning sights this year on four continents. I also got to see some old friends I hadn’t seen in years because they moved, which reminded me how lucky I am to have made such idyllic memories with them in different parts of the world throughout my years of travelling and living in various cities. It’s bittersweet and sometimes odd to go through life without the physical presence of friends whom you used to see frequently each week but have since moved away and continued their own lives in different cities. I know this is something I will struggle with for years to come, but I have quietly accepted it as one of the solitary pains of being friends with globetrotters, adventurers and people unwilling to accept the immediate situation they were born into.

 The top of Victoria Peak, Hong Kong with longtime friend Darian (who was with me during my motorcycle crash in Vietnam) and new friend Cheuk-Yin (also a photographer).

The top of Victoria Peak, Hong Kong with longtime friend Darian (who was with me during my motorcycle crash in Vietnam) and new friend Cheuk-Yin (also a photographer).

 Fresh pizza on the streets of Rome with Julia, whom I met in Saskatoon in 2013. She now lives in Philadelphia with her fiance.

Fresh pizza on the streets of Rome with Julia, whom I met in Saskatoon in 2013. She now lives in Philadelphia with her fiance.

In June after a month of living in Italy and travelling around Eastern Europe, I ended up back in Toronto. I was there primarily to photograph the wedding season, but I also ended up experimenting with a new direction in my career by making a transition to work in the entertainment industry. To be clear, I am still a photojournalist and travel writer, but I also wanted to see the world of showbiz for myself because of my intense interest but also because I believe I have a lot to learn from such a tough industry. Growing up in Canada where we are known for our politeness, I used to take for granted how nice and helpful everyone was. Through working with difficult people this year, I learned how underrated niceness is. I spend every day handling many big personalities and big egos. The directness of these people who are used to getting their way was hard to handle at first but the harshness makes me appreciate all the love heaped on me by friends and family. I realize I am extremely lucky and I try to be nice to every single person I interact with.

 Sailing around Toronto Harbour

Sailing around Toronto Harbour

 Sicilian countryside in May

Sicilian countryside in May

2017 also brought new faces to my life and I experienced some of the most heart-breaking stories; and made some phenomenal memories. I got back into recreational sailing and made a journey on a small dinghy this summer around the Toronto Island. I tubed down a river in Vang Vieng, Laos, and almost met an unfortunate end, if not for someone who came back to stay with me (I’m not ready to tell this story yet, but one day I will be). I met some people who told me some heart-wrenching stories about their pasts and how they were trying to change their lives and move on beyond what life had dealt them. It amazed me how they were able to be so strong and turn so much bitterness into vulnerability and kindness. Life is not always easy, but we struggle and hope and pull through most of the time.

 A new situation I encountered in Vang Vieng, Laos, - roosters in my dining area.

A new situation I encountered in Vang Vieng, Laos, - roosters in my dining area.

I like that 2018 is a new start. A new year to prioritize goals, spend time with people I enjoy, and to explore new passions. A new year full of travel, learning and creating. 

 Erice, Sicily, 2017

Erice, Sicily, 2017

Read 2016, 2015, 2014